7 Ways To Make Shipper-Carrier Relationships Better

Freight services are very important and load boards work great at connecting shippers with carriers. But the relationship between carrier and shippers ought to be good for the process to work out smoothly and be a win-win kind of a process. Fortunately, there are so many ways that can help improve the relationship between these two important people in the business. With stronger relationships, a reliable carrier network is maintained. By giving attention to carrier concerns, it is possible to build collaborative partnerships that are long lasting.

As a shipper, there are a few things that you can do to maintain a good relationship with your carrier.

1. Work for the good of everyone involved. This can be done by working with the carrier in determining which freights and lanes work the best. By working in conjunction with the carrier, then it is possible for profitability to be added to the network. It solidifies the relationship.

2. Honor commitment to the carriers. It is only when you honor your commitments to the carrier they will be able to honor theirs to you. Considering that carrier will usually base service price on data provided, then it is of importance that only accurate data should be provided. You should also ensure that you ship in tonnages and lanes that you say you will.

3. Be generous. This is in terms of the sharing opportunities that arise. When you bring new opportunities first to your carrier partner, then everybody will end up benefiting from an equitable agreement.

4. Start off with a plan. One of the best ways of avoiding a rocky start that could ruin an otherwise good relationship is to make sure that you start every new partnership with a plan. Allow a considerable amount of time for the carrier to get their system up and even train to take on new lanes and freights.

5. Avail all relevant data. The data that you provide during bidding process will largely determine how prepares the carrier is with regards to freight characteristics and location or even seasonal changes in terms of volume. It is therefore very important that you provide freight characteristic percentages and also monthly volume in addition to tonnage data and lane data that you give.

6. Keep communication lines open. Reviewing performance metrics, options and new services are always a good way of strengthening relationships. As a shipper consider holding regular meetings with carriers to discuss what matters most to the business. Using such meetings, you can come up with strategies to reduce costs and improve the business. Working together and communicating on a regular basis only solidifies the shipper-carrier relationship.

7. Embrace technology. In the same manner you expect real-time data on your shipments from your carriers you should make it equally easy for the carriers to transfer the data that you need. Choose programming options that offer them an accurate and smooth system of transferring the data that you need. There are so many technological tools that you can choose to make improvements to the business and relationship.

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A Quick Introduction To Behavioural Economics

The study of human behaviour, which has traditionally come under the umbrella of psychology, would seem to have little relationship with economics.

But, as we learn more about how the brain works through the dual disciplines of neuroscience and psychology, there is an increasing marriage with the field of economics, in order to better understand how people make financial decisions.

This has evolved considerably in recent years and is an emergent field that deserves a little introduction and explanation.

The traditional view of economics and financial decision-making

It is sometimes forgotten in economics that the field is meant to be about the behaviour of people when making financial decisions.

The traditional economist’s view is that the world is populated by unemotional, logical, decision makers, who always think rationally in drawing their conclusions. This view is underpinned by the understanding that human behaviour displays three key traits: unbounded rationality, unbounded willpower, and unbounded selfishness.

This has always flown in the face of the findings of cognitive and social psychologists, who questioned these assumptions as far back as the 1950s.

With the rise of behavioural neuroscience since the 1980s (especially Kahneman’s work) providing more insight into the workings of the brain, we are now more sure than ever about the role that emotion and bias plays in all decision-making: from simple day-to-day decisions like which dress to wear, through to larger decisions that may affect many people.

Overconfidence and optimism are two examples of behavioural traits that may lead to sub-optimal financial decision-making, and divert from the traditional model used. People have also been shown to make poor decisions, even when they know it’s not for the best, due to a lack of self-control.

So this is where behavioural economics has been able to step in and modify many of the beliefs of the traditional economic views.

What is behavioural economics – and how can it help?

Behavioral economics and behavioral finance study the effects of psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors on economic decisions.

This may apply to individuals or institutions, and involves looking at the consequences for market prices, dividends, and resource allocation.

Of the three traits of human behaviour included in the traditional model outlined above, unbounded rationality has received special focus, with new understandings in the field resulting from neuroscience.

Understanding better how people arrive at financial decisions can help in many areas: from personal finance to organisations shaping products and trying to get more customer sign-ups; and from the vagaries of stock market trading through to governments and how they formulate financial legislation.

Perhaps behavioural economics can, in future, help people to make better decisions to safeguard their financial futures; it may even have helped if more attention had been paid to it in the lead up to the Global Financial Crisis in 2008.

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